Tax-free means more savings

When you invest in a Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA) you can save more and reach your goals faster. Because of the flexibility in a TFSA, most Canadians can benefit from having an account. Talk to your financial advisor to see if a TFSA can help you achieve your goals.

You can start planning and saving for your retirement at any age

Many of us know we should start early so our money has a longer time to grow. With the costs of buying a home, raising kids (and paying for their education), it may be hard to get going, let alone know where to begin.

The Tax-Free Savings Account can be a misunderstood savings tool

Considered by some to be a short-term investment, many of us do not value its long-term savings potential. If you’re in your 20’s, you have time on your side and are well positioned to make (or exceed) a million dollars of tax- free savings by retirement. If you’re getting a late start with investing, don’t worry. Individuals in their 30’s, 40’s and 50’s can still accumulate significant tax-free savings by the time they’re ready to retire.

What is the deal with those Retirement Savings Plans anyway?

A Retirement Savings Plan or RSP as they say, is one of the best ways to help ensure your financial security. I had my doubts but considering it has been around for over 60 years, I figured there had to be something to this RSP thing. And guess what, there is!

What is a segregated fund?

I will be honest, when I first started investing my money I had never heard of a segregated fund. Mutual funds, stocks, and bonds yes, but no mention of segregated funds. It was not until my friend purchased a segregated fund that I learned more about them and what they could do for me.

If you’re like most people, the dollars you have for savings are not unlimited

If you’re like most people, the dollars you have for savings are not unlimited. That means you have some decisions to make, including whether it makes more sense to pay down your mortgage quickly or invest in an RSP. It’s true that reducing your mortgage quickly makes a lot of sense, but you’ll also need a significant nest egg if you want to retire in comfort.

How to choose between an RSP and a TFSA

For years Canadians have utilized Retirement Savings Plans (RSPs) as the primary investment vehicle for retirement savings. With the introduction of Tax-Free Savings Account (TFSA), there has been great debate over where to invest: RSP or TFSA? Although the two account types share some common traits, there are some key differences.

Does a payout annuity fit your retirement plan?

A payout annuity is a unique product that provides regular guaranteed income in retirement. It’s the ideal solution if you don’t have a regular income from a company pension plan, or if you would like to supplement other retirement income streams, such as Old Age Security (OAS) or Canada/Quebec Pension Plan.

A segregated fund may just be the way to go

If you, like me are looking for a little security, a segregated fund may just be the way to go. Segregated funds are similar to mutual funds in that your investment is pooled with other investors’ assets and invested for you. A fund manager is responsible for selecting the investments that make up the fund. Where segregated funds differ is in the guarantee. Yes, I said guarantee.

Does it really matter which investment option I choose or from where?

We know it can be hard to put money away each month. Making the jump from thinking to doing is the first step in achieving your financial goal. The second step, which can be just as daunting, is to decide which type of investment option supports your financial strategy.

When building an investment portfolio, it is important to make sure you are comfortable with the level of risk.

There are certain things in life that can send us on an emotional rollercoaster. Money can be one of them. We all work hard for our paycheque and the thought of losing, even a little bit, can send even the most stoic of us into a tailspin. So, when it comes to investing, it is no wonder we vow to never invest again when markets drop a few points.